Read: Peacemaker, by C.J. Cherryh

Peacemaker is the 15th novel in Cherryh’s Foreigner series, and the last one in this 5th 3-book story arch… and even as I write these words I want to go back and say that this arc really started with book #7 – Destroyer. Which means this specific part of the tale spans no less than nine individual books. It has been a fun ride but with lots of loose ends left dangling.

Peacemaker is the book that FINALLY un-dangled (most of) them. At last.

In Peacemaker we at last settle the Coup. At last our protagonists have found the real cause behind the Troubles. At last they manage to amend it.

At last these people can move on, from on-world politics and into… well, that is an issue for books to come, surely, as Cherryh apparently is working on a yet unnamed Foreigner novel, but just as Bren don’t automatically adjusts to a life were he’s not allowed to meddle with Guild business it feels odd to look back at fifteen full length novels and feel that I’d be satisfied if the ride ended here.

That said Peacemaker is the best Foreigner novel in a long time, even despite some editing errors, one of which feels like a continuity error; I guess the scene was moved on the timeline necessitating a few minor adjustments that never got submitted? However which way the story starts in classic Cherryh mode, with a longish reiteration or build-up basically consisting of a lot of “telling”. But as the story shifts into instantaneous time the tempo picks up and the switches between Bren’s versus Caijeri’s viewpoints are tight, moving the story forward at a fast pace and with tension growing but ultimately ending with a satisfactory conclusion.

In my personal opinion anyone interested in interaction between different cultures, in the workings of different societies, in language usage and culture, in intricate politics and social structures should read something by Cherryh. Because even when the editing, as it sometimes is in the later books, is lacking the story as such, and the way she tells it, is often uniquely good.

If the sheer volume of the Foreigner series feels daunting there are many others to chose from, some of which are reviewed by me. Just click the “Cherryh” tag in the right-hand tag cloud and you can see what I thought of them.

Because you need support a living author who deserves a readership :)

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Read: A Study in Scarlet, by Arthur Conan Doyle

A Study in Scarlet is, of course, the first of Doyle’s classic stories featuring what must by now be the most famous detective throughout history – Sherlock Holmes. However, reading the original stories makes one realise that it is the various adaptations of Sherlock that has made his fame – not the written source material.

The story is divided into two parts.

The first part is where Watson makes a new acquaintance, moving in with Mr Holmes. We get to read about his reactions to this Sherlock fellow but we also get an earful about the doctor himself – he returns to England very weak after almost having died from his wound and spends most of his time indoors and in bed. But then one morning, when he is up earlier than usual, he ends up visiting his first crime scene – a murder, in an empty or perhaps abandoned house.

So far so good. But suddenly part one ends and part two abruptly catapults the reader across the ocean, to the US, and to the founding of Salt Lake City. Initially this change of scenes make no sense but then names we heard in part one re-appear and suddenly the motive behind the not one but two murders perpetrated in part one is uncovered; and the reader gets to understand that neither of these evil deeds would had happened if Mormonism had been a more generous and open-minded creed.

As I wanted to read A Study in Scarlet as a crime/detective story I found the first part promising but the second part slow and uninteresting, even as I felt Doyle poured more heart in it, and it didn’t get better, either – the last handful of pages is pure info-dumping, with Mr Holmes telling Dr Watson about the clues everyone had missed: how he saw them, and how he interpreted them. Which makes me wonder if Doyle’s underlying reason for writing this story was to expose what he felt was the errors of the LDS/Mormons, and with the invention of Sherlock pure collateral; originally intended as nothing more than a tool for telling this tale. A tool which then took on a life of it’s own.

Obviously.

A Study in Scarlet has its place in the history of the crime novel genre, and as the point were a legend got started. But as reading material for the 21st century it doesn’t measure up. In my humble opinion.